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Graffiti Legend Banksy Goes Undercover In Gaza To Expose Destruction

Graffiti Legend Banksy Goes Undercover In Gaza To Expose Destruction

Bomb damage, Gaza City. Credit: Banksy

British graffiti legend Banksy, known for his street art that is often political in nature, has gone undercover in Gaza to reveal life in the war-torn territory.

“Make this the year YOU discover a new destination,” a two-minute video released by Banksy from Gaza proclaims. The video (watch it below), which appears to be a parody of travel advertisements, exposes the hardships that Gazan men, women and children face through dark humor.

Gaza is often described as ‘the world’s largest open air prison’ because no-one is allowed to enter or leave. But that seems a bit unfair to prisons – they don’t have their electricity and drinking water cut off randomly almost every day. Credit: Banksy

“The locals like it so much they never leave”, says bold white text in the video with children walking along Gaza’s streets.

“Because they’re not allowed to,” clarifies the next frame, showing Israeli security forces.

‘If we wash our hands of the conflict between the powerful and the powerless we side with the powerful – we don’t remain neutral’. Credit: Banksy

The video was released alongside several pieces of street art, which were published on Banksy’s website.

A local man came up and said ‘Please – what does this mean?’ I explained I wanted to highlight the destruction in Gaza by posting photos on my website – but on the internet people only look at pictures of kittens.’ Credit: Banksy

The latest conflict in Gaza, codenamed Operation Protective Edge by the Israelis, resulted in the deaths of 539 children out of a total of 2,000 Palestinians.

With a ban on construction equipment and material from entering the Gaza Strip, locals have struggled to rebuild their homes. According to the UN, 500,000 Gazans were displaced during the 50 day conflict that saw the destruction of more than 18,000 buildings.

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