Opinion

Negativity: Egypt’s Destructive Underrated Problem

Negativity: Egypt’s Destructive Underrated Problem

Among the many dire social ills that have faced and continue to face Egyptian society, one is almost always seemingly forgotten. One that most Egyptians extensively participate in, whether aware of it or not. One that can have the power to affect and shape our society’s present and future. Infiltrating the air we breathe and plaguing our daily lives, negativity is the poison silently spreading and affecting us all.

It seems like you can’t have an ordinary conversation with an Egyptian these days without it somehow turning into a cry of frustration about our society’s various issues or negative aspects. Always tainted with a hint of sarcastic humor that garners a laugh or two, it is an all too common phenomenon we all see and deal with every single day.

One can argue that many people’s conversations are loosely structured on complaining, about everything, without acknowledging anything that’s actually positive. There are so many things that are wrong about that. In a country where loss of hope has become the most common consensus, it begs the question: Is this the solution?

Many Egyptians today seem to only focus on all that is negative in their society, and the media is definitely guilty of partaking in this dreadful ritual. Through consistently highlighting the negative, and eliminating the positive, the sensationalism of the media draws this hopeless, bleak, and hollow image of reality, leading millions across the country into an endless spiral of negativity and even possibly depression. It’s no surprise or coincidence that frustration fills the air, when we are constantly surrounded by negative media messages.

Also troubling is the fact that even when some try to raise awareness about social issues and try to make a difference in our society, they tackle it from negativity’s perspective. They focus on the negative problem, instead of focusing on the proposed positive solution to the problem.

“I will never attend an anti-war rally; if you have a peace rally, invite me,” Mother Teresa once said, making it clear that negativity only brings more negativity. It can’t help us. It can’t help anyone. However, when we focus on the positive outcomes we want to achieve, we can actually get closer to achieving them. Moreover, when we focus on what is already positive in our society, we can receive more of it. We need only make the effort to try.

The law of attraction is simple. Like attracts like. Negative thinking yields negative results, just as positive thinking yields positive results. So, why can’t we apply this when it comes to thinking about our country and our society? Why can’t we open our minds up to the possibility that things are not as bad as they may seem to us? Why can’t we focus on the positive results we want to achieve, instead of the current problems? And, why can’t we be grateful for what we already have?

It’s important to note that thinking positively doesn’t mean to pretend that our problems and issues don’t exist. I’m not saying that we should close our eyes and tell ourselves that the world is all skittles and sunshine. Positivity is not denial; it is the correct approach to changing things for the better.

I am aware that it seems absurd and quite possibly downright ridiculous to many people, that thinking positively can have a real positive impact, but there’s one thing for sure, negativity surely can’t.

Positivity may not be the most practical of solutions, but it’s definitely a great first step, a step forward. And while it may seem somewhat difficult for some people to find the positive and the good, I can assure you, with a willing mind, and a new perspective, you can, and will find it.

Edited by Marina Kilada

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Opinion

Noha Saad is a Mass Communication student who has an enduring interest in the intriguing world of the media. https://instagram.com/ns.saad/

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