Arts & Culture

5 Classic Family Activities & Boardgames to Re-Visit During Quarantine

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5 Classic Family Activities & Boardgames to Re-Visit During Quarantine

A game of Monopoly. Image courtesy of Pexels.

Remember spending hours on end playing Monopoly, starting with simple plot-buying beginnings only to end up turning into massive family feuds? Or confidently walking into Twister thinking ‘I got this’, only to find out that no one’s balance or flexibility can match up to Twister’s twists. 

Yes, those were simple times full of fun group activities and games that would take up a good chunk of the day. As years passed, people eventually got more and more engulfed in technology and the rush of everyday life, slowly forgetting about these past simple pleasures. 

While everyone is stuck in quarantine, attempting to self-isolate and social distance themselves while also trying to find things to fill their days at home with, now is the perfect time to re-visit these classic activities and games with your family. Not only will these activities and games introduce a new layer of fun to time spent at home, but they are also reminders of how these group activities can build (or break) bonds with those around you – in addition to teaching us a thing or two about ourselves, working with others and life itself. 

Monopoly

A classic game of Monopoly can last for hours on end. Image credit unknown.

Monopoly is definitely a classic board game that has lived on one generation after another. In this game, the activity usually starts out light and friendly only to have some sort of a turning point somewhere down the line – a turning point that could, in some cases, make or break some family or friendly ties. 

Of course, it’s all in good fun however. The game can consist of between two to eight players, and each player gets to choose their token (an object that represents them as they move around the board). Each player is handed the same amount of money at the beginning of the game, and then when the order has been established, the first player rolls the dice. From then on, players simply try to purchase as many plots they land on as possible.

At some point during the game, people start tp purchase houses and hotels to build on their land, in order to collect more money from whoever lands there – this is where things can get ugly at times. So long as everyone plays in good spirit, however, the game is enjoyable nonetheless. Keep in mind that Monopoly is notorious for being a game that could last for hours.

Twister

A classic game of Twister always ends up with falls and laughs. Image credit unknown.

Another classic board game, Twister has always been a crowd pleaser thanks to its unusual physical nature and the challenged it presents. Twister usually consists of two to four players, however it is a lot more fun with four players. 

The four players form a team of two each and the teams of two begin by standing side by side of opposite ends of the mat. They then await the ‘Twister master’ to spin the board at hand and inform them of where to place their hands or feet. 

At first, the game always seems easy, until all of a sudden one finds themselves in a precarious position having to find a way to manoeuvre their left hand between their legs and under their partner’s back in order to place it on a blue circle. In any case, the game is both a challenge and a good stretch, and when one falls, they usually come back up laughing hysterically. 

Risk

One may risk breaking some strong family or friendly ties when playing Risk, but that game’s in the name. Image credit unknown.

Another long-lasting board game – this one can last for up to several hours, maybe even days in some cases – Risk is a classic strategy game. This game consists of anywhere between two to six players, and the goal of each player is to take over or ‘conquer’ every territory on the board’s map. 

The game initially begins with each player occupying a certain territory on the map, with their army. Each player then rolls dice in order to figure out how to move around the board. Throughout the game, people may form alliances with each other, but they may also choose to break them just as easily. So yes, even Risk can make or break family or friendly ties. However, the game is usually a thrill and it can really get those brain muscles working, as one plots and strategizes the next best move. 

Uno

Uno is a fun and quick little game for the whole family. Image credit unknown.

Uno may not be a board game, but it’s a fun classic card game. This game can consist of between two to 10 players and is great, quick little game that can be played in multiple rounds at a time.

In Uno, the person who wins is the one who manages to finish all their cards first. People take turns to match the card that is set in front of them, however, the beauty of the game is that the players can control what is placed in the middle. 

There are certain wild cards that can either help the player who withholds them or cause trouble for other players. In Uno, if people concentrate enough with each and every player, then they may be able to plot their demise as well – there can only be one winner after all. 

Giant Puzzles

These giant puzzles are a great way to practice patience, all while bonding with the family. Image courtesy of Flickr.

Giant puzzles are not necessarily board games, but they are a very fun group activity that one can pursue with their family. Puzzles have always been a fun sort of challenge, which would usually result in a beautiful outcome that would make all the time spent attempting to put the correct pieces together worth it.

During quarantine, why not keep challenging oneself further by attempting to piece together one of those thousand piece puzzles. It might take days to complete, but it will surely act as a reminder of the importance of patience and that although some things might take time, the result is always worth it in the end. 

Honorable Mentions: Snakes and Ladders, Connect Four, Any card game (Estimation, El Shayeb [The King], Tarneeb)

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A believer in all things art. Loves writing, acting, theatre and pretending to know how to cook.

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