Opinion

A Letter From An Egyptian Woman to President Sisi

A Letter From An Egyptian Woman to President Sisi

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Dear Mr. President,

I hope this letter finds you well. Please allow me to introduce myself. I am an Egyptian woman.

Let me begin by telling you why I am writing this letter. I have absolute faith in my country. I not only believe in the power of my people, but I also believe in the pillars that hold together our society. As an Egyptian, I believe in Egypt.

This letter holds no political value. The purpose of this letter is not to stir controversy or threaten national security. I write to you today as a citizen to its President. I am keen on strengthening ties between us for the benefit of Egypt. In other words, I just want you to get to know me better.

Mr. President, as I mentioned above, I believe in the pillars that hold together our society such as honesty, respect, and patriotism, yet, I am baffled and beyond dismayed at the way society chooses to treat me.

I live in pain. I live in oppression. I live as a second-class citizen.

I live in pain every day as I wake up to prepare myself for school, university, work, or merely to tend to my daily duties. When I walk in my country’s streets, I feel degraded. I feel out of place. I feel unsafe. In our country, eight out of ten Egyptian women feel unsafe on their streets, and even more feel unsafe when on public transport.

My pain is derived from the way I am treated on our streets. I have to suffer through penetrating stares, vulgar comments and unfortunately at times, several kinds of violence.

I live in pain because the only place I feel safe is at home. That’s if I am lucky enough to find solace at home, because unfortunately in Egypt nine out of ten girls are disciplined violently. What is even more shocking is that female teenagers in our country are beginning to think that domestic violence is justified, so much so, that three out of four female teenagers think that a man is justified to beat his wife if she argues with him.

Metaphorically so, my people, or what has become of my people, have denied me the right to freedom, the right to safety, the right to live.

This is only a part of the hell that has become my life. Violence against women in Egypt continues to be a never-ending battle, 91 percent of females in our country have experienced female genital mutilation. The dangers of such outdated ideologies pose a threat to our advancement as a nation due to the fact that the majority of our society accepts such a murderous practice.

It seems as though as the days progressed Egypt has regressed in women’s empowerment. Recently, our beloved country Egypt was titled the seventh worst regarding political empowerment of women; out of 135 countries Egypt came number 128. Economic inequalities limit women’s abilities to empower themselves. A woman in Egypt is four times as likely to get unemployed than a man.

Education, in Egypt, is still a struggle for females; female adult literacy is 58 percent compared to 75 percent in adult males. Those numbers do not shock me as Egypt has recently acquired low level statuses in studies including access to education, job opportunities and economic participation for women.

Furthermore, close to 50 percent of women in our country would tell you that they face problems at work that their male colleagues don’t.

The mere basics of a dignified life such as education and healthcare have become privileges in our nation. Proper healthcare and health education are almost non-existent. In Egypt, with every 100,000 births, 66 women die to causes related to maternal health and delivery, and 460 women’s lives continue to be at risk of maternal death after delivery.

Health education, especially sexual health education, is almost non-existent. In Egypt, 14 percent of overall births are unwanted; they were either untimely or unwanted from the start. This is an indication of the sexual inequalities and the profound unmet needs of women in Egypt. The lack of literacy and education concerning sexual health such as the use of contraceptives limits women’s ability to plan their pregnancies.

Meanwhile, several misconceptions about women’s health and health in general like ‘cancer is contagious’, causes men to divorce their wives if they fall sick with breast cancer.

Maybe those numbers can begin to explain to you why I live in oppression.

I live in oppression because when I was born, like so many others, society chose my destiny for me. I was destined to grow up, get married and have children. I was not destined to be lawyer, a teacher or even the President. I was silenced. I was told that what I had to say was not important because I am a woman. I am an emotional being that has no control over itself.

In a world that lives under inhumane circumstance, my ‘emotions’ have been interpreted as a sign of weakness. I am not weak. I was not born weak. And I will not be called weak. My ‘emotions’ are a sign of strength and integrity. My passion for society and for a brighter future fuels me to change. It fuels me to become the change I want to see in society. This is why I am writing this letter. I want to change my stolen future and I want you to help me.

Mr. President, if you may, try to understand the situation I am in. Despite my god given right to freedom, I was enslaved in a world that crippled every hope I had for my future. I was stigmatized. I was labeled. I was stereotyped into characters that do so little to express the beauty within my being. The names I was called, the labels I have acquired and the characters society drew for me do not, in their best form, capture the potential that is me.

So, I had no choice but obey society, for I continue to be a captive of society’s insidious torture on my gender.

I live as a second-class citizen. In our beautiful glorious nation, I am deemed unworthy of respect, unworthy of admiration and unworthy of freedom.

Despite everything mentioned above, I still rose to be the best I could be given the circumstances I grew up with. Despite being told otherwise, I knew my potential lied far beyond the dimensions of my house. I knew I was destined to change society, I knew I could save Egypt.

This is why when I chanted and shouted at the top of my lungs for freedom, when I marched in my country’s streets with pride, I wanted freedom for my country, because I knew that a free Egypt would entail freedom for me as well.

Mr. President, I have a request to ask of you. However, before I ask, let me be clear on something. I do not want your pity, for I may have been a victim, but I will not live as one. I do not regard myself as a victim. I am fully aware of what I am capable of as a woman. All I ask of you is to come to terms with my potential.

The issues I face lie beyond sexual harassment and violence. With that said, I appreciate the efforts our government has taken to ensure that such acts are not present in Egypt’s future. Yet, education, empowerment, health and social equality, just to name a few, are equally important.

Mr. President, I want to help build Egypt with you. I want to help build my country. I want my stolen future back and I will not rest until my future returns to me. All I ask of you is to grant me my right to live in my country as a free woman. I not only want to be a free woman, but I want your promise to support, uphold and respect my wishes until the last day you serve as my president. I want you to support my fight. My fight to equal pay, my fight to equal rights, my fight to equal opportunities and my war against terrorists that lurk my streets hungry for my body.

Last but not least, my last request of you, when you speak of me in your thoughtful and well written speeches do not call me “the mothers, wives and sisters,” because the truth is I am equally a family member to a male as I am to him a boss, a doctor, an engineer and even their source of protection like a policewoman.

I want you to support me. I want you to support me, an Egyptian woman.

Yours ever so truly,

An Egyptian woman.

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  • disqus_MhMOForyEv

    الرئيس السيسي ده طحوطى فى طيزك ده رئيسك انتي مش رئيسنا احنا

  • Kamali

    Farida! Never give up on what now you have started. Many woman do agree and feel you are their voice. Egypt is my adopted country and me being from another nationality I found this very disturbing and unfair for my fellow Egyptian sisters. Wish the best of lucks!

  • Pingback: Carta de una mujer egipcia al presidente Sisi | Al-Andalus en el siglo XXI()

  • Ikhwanii Extincticus

    I just watched a niqabi have a dental procedure done in clinic. It was like watching some kind of weird alternative universe where sane people have to deal with insane. The ‘thing’ in black and I say thing because I have no idea what is was because it was not allowed to speak and the man that came with it done all the speaking for it si I did not know what it was male or female in that 10 metres of black polyester. As if that was not bad enough we watched as it tried to maneouvre the polyester around the lips to try to reveal some teeth. ‘It’ sat for almost one full hour with a gaping mouth because ‘it’ couldn’t see anything or know when to close the mouth between the changing of instruments or lull in procedure. It was utterly farcical to watch and utterly terrifying at the same time. The author send a letter to Sisi. BUT not a word as mentioned about this cancer invading Egypt of the extremist fanatical ignorance of these Wahabi lunatics and the truly terrifying thing is that these also are the mothers and father of the next generation of Egyptians. The niqab should be outlawed and every other extremist Wahabi fad by the government and outlawed by the religious institution because in my opinions it is a cancer that is spreading it’s ignorance and degradation of women on such a scale never known before. Watching that pantomime last night really was something that had to be videoed to be spread around Egyptian TV to show how disturbed the Egyptian mind has become to accept that as some kind of ‘normal’. Until this madness is rooted out there will NEVER be respect for women in Egypt. It’s a full 27 hours since I witnessed that fiasco and I am still seething. Sisi I call on you to outlaw the Niqab and demand the Al Azhar condemn it as a first step to respecting women in Egypt. The root has to be tackled to stop the cancer.

    • Sian MyworldMybabies

      That is extremely rude. How dare you address that woman as an ‘it’ who are you do label her as ‘it’? Regardless of her niqabi or what she wears she is a woman!!! An one quick question how many men do you know that wear a niqabi???

  • Who

    [ .. when you speak of me in your thoughtful and well written speeches do not call me “the mothers, wives and sisters,” .. ]

    Excellent. Call out the misogyny.

  • michael

    Farida, I really admire you ,You are really a fighter
    God bless you and I hope the President will take your letter very seriously;
    and meet with some religious leaders to reach some understanding about the treatment of women in Egypt
    Religious leaders can contribute to your problem.

  • hapeemaree

    This is a letter from a woman who was severely misled, not by her government by what many people lead them to believe they are. There are a multitude of women here who are none of what you speak of. Many women choose to remain docile and unemployed. Sorry, that IS the truth. Somehow someone has to look beyond many statistics. It is a problem of culture, practice and social acceptance. NOT a problem of GOVERNANCE. Don’t bark on Sisi to address a problem parents have to handle.

    • Eliane Keralla Liacopoulo Niel

      well spoken hapeemaree

  • Hadeer Fatehy

    Farida,I can`t agree more ! all the best on your way , your career, and your fight. We fight every single day of our lives to live. We deserve to live and dream about future with no strains coming out of the fact being women. Women can survive this. Women are strong. They already take part of every man`s life .Not just that, they control their lives too in a way or another. We are powerful ; we are not weak. Biiiiiiiiiiiiiiig faaaat like 🙂

  • Snehulienka Sedemtrpaslikov

    Farida, I think you address the letter to a wrong person…. This should be
    addresed to religious authority in Egypt. I am living in this country
    almost 30 years (maybe you was not yet here….) and I can tell you how I
    see deteriorating this great country from year to year…. Its not
    government,who degradate status of woman. Its not government,who push
    mobs to rape, misstreate,humiliate,sexually abuse a ladies. Its not a government,who stop them to work. Its not the government,who
    tell the families to circumcise the girls…. This all is coming from
    wrong understanding of the religion and from old traditions. Its comming from bad education of children in families….The action
    you expect from the president you should address to sheikh of Azhar. Its religion, God almighty give to peaple, to show them the way in the life. Its the religion to teach people to respect,love other creatures,including animals, trees, all nature.
    Its the duty of sheikhs in gomaa praying to raise attention to this
    problems…to talk to men with advise how to threat their
    wives, daughters, employees….. Its all come from missinterpretation of
    religion to put woman as 2.class creature. Men forget,that its women giving life.

    • magda.sara

      I can say only YES, you have true.

    • michael

      I do agree totally with you comment, Farida did the right thing by sending this fantastic letter to the president, then the later should meet with some religious leader to improve the treatment of all women in Egypt,
      And as a president of Egypt he can use his power for changing

  • Mervat

    Why are you labeling all Egyptian women as second class .? You mentioned that they have no choice to choose what they want… I would say that half the working class are made up of women who went to school , university and then to the work force.. If you go into any government office, the majority are women… if not all…The culture of beating kids applies to both genders , male and female… Boys are hit by their parents same as girls…

    • Farida Ezzat

      Hi Mervat,

      Thank you for your comment. I think it is clear that I didn’t say all Egyptian women. I think you’re also generalizing and are off base. The working class you speak of are not the majority of Egyptian women. I think you are overlooking the struggles and adversaries Egyptian women have to face to get a proper education and to be respected in the workforce. Having a job that pays way less than any adequate minimum wage, working for several hours in unbearable conditions, at times, and not being appreciated is not means for us to assume that women “choose what they want.” Often times, women enter the workforce because they need financial assistance, thus, they put up with all the above to support their families. Are you unaware of the fact that 26 percent of Egyptians live under the poverty line and those numbers increase as you move to upper Egypt where almost 50 percent of families cannot provide the basics needs of food? Also, did you know that close to 25 percent of women are unemployed?

      With regards, to your comment concerning beating of children. Just because it happens to males does that mean that we should over look it. Harassment also happens to males is that means for us to not address harassment? Simply, no.

      • Asma

        Farida, her point is that everything you mentioned here applies to males too. Working for less than minimum wage, in unbearable conditions, high unemployment — all of this applies to the majority of Egyptian men also. Men work the most dangerous, back-breaking jobs here with no safety gear and pitiful salaries. No need to make it a gender issue, it’s an issue of human rights and worker’s rights.

    • Eliane Keralla Liacopoulo Niel

      Mervat you are wright, women are all educated, work, and as you say everywhere I go, from banks to you name it it’s all run by women, even doctors, all women, my bank , the manager is a women, most Egyptian men are idiots, in the workplace I always see the men asking the women “what shall I do with this”. the government has laws to all those mistreatments of women, it’s just the women that are afraid to report, from mutilation of genitals to whatever, and to start with let them take their stupid veils off, why do they keep it? because they are afraid of their families, so guess what the government can’t help you there, there are institutions where you go and report, even at the time of Moubarak if any man harasses you in the street, you beat the crap out of him drag him to a police and he is fined 2000 pounds.

Opinion
@FaridaMEzzat

A young passionate writer hoping to become an established journalist, entrepreneur and a women's rights activist. Farida hopes that by achieving her dreams she can pave the way for other women to do the same. http://faridaezzat.wordpress.com/

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