Buzz

Egyptian Woman Minister Stirs Controversy After Wearing Short Sleeves

Egyptian Woman Minister Stirs Controversy After Wearing Short Sleeves

11940200_10156080436390066_177038441_n

Newly appointed Minister of Immigration and Egyptian Expatriate Affairs, Nabila Makram Ebeid Abdel Shahid, stirred controversy over the clothes she donned while being sworn into Egypt’s new cabinet on Saturday.

Abdel Shahid attended the swearing-in ceremony wearing a short-sleeved black top and loose black pants. While Abdel Shahid and the two other women in the cabinet, Ghada Waly and Sahar Nasr, were commended on social media for looking “elegant” and “presentable,” one television host declared that Abdel Shahid’s attire was “inappropriate for the occasion.”

Ahmed Moussa spoke out on his talk show, “’Ala Mas’ouleety,” saying that Abdel Shahid has a “respectable history” but that she made the wrong call wearing that outfit.

The women ministers’ appearance prompted a flurry of conversation on social media platforms, with Twitter users using the hashtag “Egypt is getting prettier” to say it has been “a long time” since Egypt had “chic” women ministers.

b2e5be5b-93f0-48f7-9aa0-af1fd0cbdee8_16x9_788x442

In response to Moussa’s claim and the debate that followed, privately owned AlMasry AlYoum cited an “informed source” as saying that the presidency does not have stringent rules for what to wear when meeting the president or being sworn in, adding that a formal dress code is nonetheless expected. The source continued to say that Waly and Nasr, the Minister of Social Solidarity and Minister of International Cooperation, respectively, fit the expected guidelines, while Abdel Shahid applied the guidelines “loosely” in comparison to her women colleagues.

According to the source, the correct protocol in such occasions calls upon women to have their hair “at least partially up” and to abstain from applying heavy makeup. However, the source also said that some of the male ministers did not fully adhere to the dress code, which does not allow them to wear red ties, for example.

Abdel Shahid later phoned in to journalist Wael El Ebrashy’s talk show, “Al Haqeqa,” to respond to the controversy, saying that she will be working with regular citizens on the ground but that she is not willing to change who she is simply because she has become a minister.

Prior to being appointed as a minister, Abdel Shahid worked in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, during which time she served as Egypt’s consulate general in Rome and deputy consulate general in Dubai.

UN Sparks Outrage After Saudi Ambassador Chosen to Chair Human Rights Panel
US Presidential Candidate Says America Should Not Vote for a Muslim President

Subscribe to our newsletter


Buzz

More in Buzz

Egyptian Mohamed Salah Wins UEFA Player of The Week Poll, Beating Messi and Ronaldo

Egyptian StreetsSeptember 16, 2017

Egypt Selects “Sheikh Jackson” for Foreign-Language Oscar Nomination

Egyptian StreetsSeptember 11, 2017

Egyptian-American Rami Malek to Play Queen’s Freddie Mercury in Biopic “Bohemian Rhapsody”

Egyptian StreetsSeptember 6, 2017

Here’s What Tourists Really Think of Egypt

Egyptian StreetsAugust 31, 2017

14-Year-Old Arrested in Saudi Arabia for Dancing to “Macarena” in Public

Egyptian StreetsAugust 23, 2017

Egyptian Woman Drives a Truck, Breaks the Tradition

Engy AdhamAugust 21, 2017

Al Ahly’s Amr Gamal Will Be Egypt’s First Footballer to Play in South Africa

Kari MegeedAugust 13, 2017

“Despacito” Singer Visits Egypt, Performs in North Coast

Egyptian StreetsAugust 13, 2017
Egyptian Streets is an independent, young, and grass roots news media organization aimed at providing readers with an alternate depiction of events that occur on Egyptian and Middle Eastern streets, and to establish an engaging social platform for readers to discover and discuss the various issues that impact the region.

© 2017 Egyptian Streets. All Rights Reserved.