Arts & Culture

Cairokee & Tania Saleh: Arab Voices Collide at Shubbak Festival in London

Cairokee & Tania Saleh: Arab Voices Collide at Shubbak Festival in London

The independent Egyptian band Cairokee to perform along with Lebanese artist Tania Saleh in London in celebration of the Arab contemporary culture.

Cairokee to launch their latest album No’taa Beda or ‘A Drop of White’ as part of Shubbak Festival starting on 1 July until 16 July. The concert to take place on Saturday 1 July at the Barbican Centre in London.

Cairokee is a rock band that was established in 2003 yet gained its popularity in 2011, during the 25 January revolution, when they released their single Soot Al Horreya or The Voice of Freedom.

Tania Saleh is a Lebanese singer and visual artist; she creates an original mix of Lebanese tarab and mawwal, a special kind of old poetry, or singing, with language between local colloquial and classical Arabic, flavored with folk, alternative rock and jazz.

The Shubbak or Window is London’s largest biennial festival of contemporary Arab culture. It brings glossary of artists to sing and perform together in celebration of the Arab contemporary culture. Concerts, performances, screenings, debates, exhibitions and installations from over 100 international artists, as well as over 30 artists are hosted in the festival.

“Shubbak connects London audiences and communities with the best of contemporary Arab culture through ambitious festival programs of premieres and commissions of visual arts, film, music, theatre, dance, literature and debate,” according to Shubbak.

As a charity it aims at connecting people through a celebration of the Arab heritage artistry in music, art, visual art and performances.

Music has played a significant role in mirroring the Arab contemporary culture bringing more to the lyrics than just rhythmic versus, yet music has been politically-inspired mingling with people’s experiences.

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Arts & Culture

Engy Adham is a Cairo-based journalist. She works as the managing editor at Egyptian Streets. She reports on social issues and arts and culture. Previously published in Daily News Egypt, Ahram Online among others. She received her bachelor’s degree in Multimedia Journalism and Political Science from The American University in Cairo. Follow her on @J_Adham_

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