News

Italy Charges Four Members of Egyptian Security Force with Regeni Murder

Italy Charges Four Members of Egyptian Security Force with Regeni Murder

(From L to R) Paola Regeni, Senator Luigi Manconi, Claudio Regeni and lawyer Alessandra Ballerini hold a banner reading “Truth for Giulio Regeni”, the Italian student murdered in Egypt, during a news conference at the upper house of the parliament in Rome, Italy, March 29, 2016. REUTERS/Remo Casilli

Italian prosecutors have charged Tarek Saber, Athar Kamel Mohamed Ibrahim, Uhsam Helmi, and Magdi Ibrahim Abdelal Sharif with the kidnapping, torture, and murder of Italian doctoral student Giulio Regeni. The men are set to be tried in absentia.

According to a statement released by the Italian news agency ANSA, the possible charges against the four men are ‘multi-aggravated abduction of a person, complicity in aggravated murder, and complicity in grievous bodily harm’.

According to a statement released by the Egyptian Public Prosecution, Italian prosecutors had initially found a connection between five individuals working as part of the security apparatus in Egypt, but that these individuals acted independently of any Egyptian governmental body or institution. Charges against the fifth suspect, Mahmoud Najm were dropped.

The suspects’ right to a defence is reserved, however as they did not submit to the process, Italian lawyers were assigned to their defence.

Investigations for the murder of the Italian doctorate student had lasted for at least four years, straining Egyptian and Italian diplomatic relations.

Earlier this month, the Egyptian Public Prosecution noted its appreciation of the Italian investigators and its understanding of their conclusions, but added that it has reservations concerning these conclusions. It said that the Italian conclusion lacked sufficient evidence, adding instead that its own investigations had revealed the involvement of a criminal gang.

The Egyptian Public Prosecution further asserts that the killer remains unknown and that it will continue to cooperate and exchange information with the Italians.

Regeni, a student at the University of Cambridge, went missing on January 25th, 2016. His body was found mutilated on February 3rd of the same year in a ditch on the Cairo-Alexandria highway. The doctoral student was reportedly conducting research on independent trade unions in Egypt.

In 2017, Regeni’s family appealed to Pope Francis to raise Regini’s case with Egypt’s once more. The case has sparked international attention on human rights violations in Egypt, particularly shifting the topic of surveillance from that of Egyptians to foreigners.

Fighting Hunger and Empowering Women: Meet Activist Menna Shahin
Egypt Receives First 50,000 Batch of Chinese COVID-19 Vaccine

Subscribe to our newsletter


More in News

NBE and Banque Misr Collect EGP 460 Billion From Recently Introduced Saving Certificates

Marina Makary31 January 2023

Blinken in Egypt: Discussing Stability, Cooperation, and Palestine

Egyptian Streets30 January 2023

Sisi Arrives in Armenia in First Ever Visit by an Egyptian President

Farah Rafik29 January 2023

Egypt Discovers ‘Oldest Mummy Ever Found’: Zahi Hawass

Egyptian Streets26 January 2023

Egypt’s Al-Sisi in India to Boost Strategic Partnerships and Investments

Farah Rafik25 January 2023

Forbes to Build its First-Ever Branded Tower in the New Administrative Capital

Marina Makary23 January 2023

Juhayna’s Founder and CEO Safwan Thabet and His Son Released From Prison

Egyptian Streets22 January 2023

Egypt Qualifies for Quarter-Finals of the 2023 Handball World Championship

Farah Rafik22 January 2023