Feature

Popular Egyptian television host says wives are servants for husbands

Popular Egyptian television host says wives are servants for husbands

Amr Adib, an Egyptian television host with one of the highest number of viewers in the Middle East, has equated women to servants in his latest episode.

Adib, who is also one of the most influential television hosts in the region, started his segment with a story about a woman in New York telling her new husband that he should wash his dirty dishes, pick up his used towel and clothes.

Adib, looking straight at the camera in an agitated fashion then asks, “is it not in the services of a wife, for when I leave my pants [on the floor], to pick it up? When I leave my dirty plate, to pick it up? We are starting to ask the important historical questions. Why else am I married?”

The co-host, visibly surprised, asks Adib “is that the only reason you are married?”

“No that is not the only reason, but it is not my role to pick up the pants,” replied Adib sternly.

“What do you mean pick up your pants? I came [home] tired. Pick up my pants as well?! After a while she will tell me take a day in the week and wash your clothes with your hands!”

“Something happened to women…what do you mean pick up my plate? I will drop it, you will take off my shirt and tell me ‘don’t worry, drop it again my love,’ and dress me before I sleep and cover me [with blankets] when I am cold, and turn on the air conditioner when I am hot, and not sleep until I sleep!”

The co-host, angered by Adib’s comments, sarcastically remarks “get a nanny then,” further agitating Adib, who has by now lost all his female viewers, to shout “then why is she here!”

Attempting to reason with him, the co-host says that the wife is not a servant, but Adib insists that a wife’s role is to ‘pick up my pants, and my dishes.’

“If you work and she doesn’t work, sure she might have some duties at home, but this doesn’t mean you should be disgusting, throwing your stuff all over the place,” said the co-host.

To this, Adeeb responds “it is not disgusting…it’s being a husband! Just as I saw my dad. He would enter, throw his stuff and my mother would pick it up.”

When the co-host says that this still does not entitle a man to act irresponsibly, Adib exclaims “what, so do you take off your shirt and hang it up yourself?!”

‘The global system will collapse’

In a warning to all men across the globe, Adib declared that “this is a coup,” and that if you permit a wife to tell her husband to pick up his dirty dishes, then all women will tell their husbands to pick up their plates and will tell their husbands to pick up their pants.

“We will not pick up anything! After a while, they will tell us have a shower alone!” said Adib before the co-host questioned his masculinity, asking whether this is what being manly means.

“Of course it is! Then why is she here! Why are we married?” asks Adib, “If we permit for this to happen once for a woman in New York, then the whole global system will collapse!”

Tourists return to Egypt after three years of turbulence
Are Copts Fleeing Egypt?

Subscribe to our newsletter


Feature

More in Feature

From Mythical Creature to Endangered Species: The Egyptian Vulture

Egyptian StreetsMay 21, 2019

“We Are Data”: Inspiring Cairo Event Presents Grassroots Approaches to Technology

Egyptian StreetsMay 18, 2019

Social Initiative Enables Future in Theatre Production for Unprivileged Youth in Ezbet Khayrallah

Egyptian StreetsMay 16, 2019

On a Free Trip to Egypt: Americans, Egyptians Battle Stereotypes

Sara AhmedMay 15, 2019

Review: ‘The Book of Cairo’ – The City Searching For Truth

Mirna AbdulaalMay 10, 2019

How Mobile Apps Catch On to Ramadan: Commercialization or Social Potential?

Egyptian StreetsMay 10, 2019

Handicrafts Promote the Culture of Entrepreneurship in Egypt

Enas El NemrMay 10, 2019

This Decluttering Campaign Sheds Light on Overconsumption in Egypt

Nour EltiganiMay 8, 2019
Egyptian Streets is an independent, young, and grass roots news media organization aimed at providing readers with an alternate depiction of events that occur on Egyptian and Middle Eastern streets, and to establish an engaging social platform for readers to discover and discuss the various issues that impact the region.

© 2017 Egyptian Streets. All Rights Reserved.