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New Egypt Law Cracksdown On “Tunnel Diggers” With Life Sentences

New Egypt Law Cracksdown On “Tunnel Diggers” With Life Sentences

tunnel

Egypt’s President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi issued on Sunday a legislation punishing those who dig or use border tunnels for communication with foreign countries by life in prison, the state agency MENA reported.

The draft law amends article 82 in the penal code, adding that the life-in-prison penalty would punish whoever “digs, prepares or uses a road, a passage or an underground tunnel at border areas to communicate with a foreign body, a state or one of its subjects” or to help persons, goods, equipment or machines in and out of the country, MENA reported.

The same penalty applies to those who are aware of the use (or planned use) of underground tunnels for the aforementioned purposes without informing the concerned authorities, the legislation adds.

The legislation also allows the government to seize any buildings beneath which tunnels are dug or tools used to dig them.

Egypt’s cabinet had approved the legislation, which was initially proposed by the president, on April 1.

Security forces have been targeting the illegal tunnels dug up in Sinai to connect it with Gaza, intensifying tunnel demolition starting July 2013.

Egyptian authorities say the tunnels are used to smuggle arms to militants in the Peninsula.

Egypt’s armed forces announced on March 29 the discovery of a 2.8 kilometre-long and three metre-deep on the eastern border. The tunnel was used by “terrorists” and “criminals” in the smuggling of individuals, goods, and “arms and ammunition”, the army spokesman said in a statement.

Egypt is building a “buffer zone” at the shared border area between North Sinai and the Gaza strip. The cabinet issued a decision last October to clear 500 metres of the border area of civilians.

The area was, however, doubled to 1,000 meters in November, after discovering some tunnels in the Peninsula over 800 metres long.

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  • Commander_Chico

    Why doesn’t Egypt open the regular border crossing with Gaza? That way, there could be legal trade with strict inspections.

    • Minymina

      Because even with the border crossing open, the tunnels were still being used to transport illegal goods and weaponry.

      • Commander_Chico

        I am not talking about the tunnels, they should be illegal.

        But why does Egypt isolate Gaza from legal travel and trade? Seems like they are doing Israel’s work.

        • Minymina

          They isolate Gaza because of Hamas which has been involved in illegal activity in Egypt.

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Aswat Masriya is a Thomson Reuters Foundation-sponsored website that covers Egypt's transition to democracy. en.aswatmasriya.com

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