News

Import Tariffs on 320 Goods Increased by up to 60 Percent in Egypt

Import Tariffs on 320 Goods Increased by up to 60 Percent in Egypt

sticlute-de-parfum-2

Import tariffs increases would boost customs revenues by EGP 6 billion a year, if imports remained at current volumes, Egypt’s finance ministry said in a statement on Sunday.

Egypt imposed on Thursday an increase on customs duties on 320 goods, to 60 percent for many items. The decision aims to encourage domestic production and reduce imports, according to the finance ministry. However, goods from the EU, the Arab region, Turkey, and some African states will be excluded from the new custom tariffs said Egyptian authorities.

“The decision aims to provide the necessary climate to attract investments, and give a strong boost to increasing local productivity,” the statement read.

“It also aims to reduce the import rates that the Egyptian market suffered from in recent years, and led to an increase in the trade deficit to reach more than $49 billion,” the statement added.

The ministry said that the increases were in compliance with World Trade Organisation standards, stressing that tariff increases do not apply to countries with which Egypt has active free trade agreements.

According to the statement, the increases targeted products that have local alternatives as well as goods that were deemed non-essential.

Among the products targeted by the increase were air conditioners, fans, refrigerators and microwave ovens, in which their tariffs were increased to 60 per cent from 40 per cent. Tariffs on cosmetics were also raised by the same percentage, while customs on carpets increased from 30 per cent to 60 per cent.

The decision comes around a month after the government floated the Egyptian pound and raised energy prices by 30-47 per cent to receive a $12 billion loan from the International Monetary Fund.

This marks the second tariff increase this year in Egypt as tariff rates were raised on a wide range of imports in January.

Egypt, which relies heavily on imports, has been facing a shortage of foreign currency since a 2011 uprising drove tourists and investors away, who represented major sources of hard currency.

This content is by Aswat Masriya.

Senior Heinz Egypt Employee Arrested After 62 Tonnes of Rotten Tomatoes Found
'Disgusting Video' of Ketchup Production Called Misleading by Heinz Egypt

Subscribe to our newsletter


News
@AswatMasriya_En

Aswat Masriya is a Thomson Reuters Foundation-sponsored website that covers Egypt's transition to democracy. en.aswatmasriya.com

More in News

Egypt’s Unemployment Rate Down to 10 Percent in Q3 of 2018

Egyptian StreetsNovember 16, 2018

Egypt ‘Appreciates’ and ‘Trusts’ Final Saudi Investigation into Khashoggi Killing

Egyptian StreetsNovember 16, 2018

Archaeological Mission Unearths Ancient Pregnant Woman Burial

Egyptian StreetsNovember 14, 2018

Egyptian MP to Submit Bill Omitting Religion from National IDs to Parliament

Egyptian StreetsNovember 12, 2018

British Parliament Encourages Lifting the Travel Ban Imposed on Sharm El Sheikh

Nour EltiganiNovember 11, 2018

Egyptian Film ‘Yomeddine’ Wins at Geneva Film Festival

Mirna AbdulaalNovember 10, 2018

UN: Food Aid to Be Doubled to 14 Million Yemenis to Avert Starvation

Mirna AbdulaalNovember 10, 2018

Bedouin Tribes of ‘Sinai Trail’ Get Backing From Egypt’s Ministry of Tourism

Mirna AbdulaalNovember 10, 2018
Egyptian Streets is an independent, young, and grass roots news media organization aimed at providing readers with an alternate depiction of events that occur on Egyptian and Middle Eastern streets, and to establish an engaging social platform for readers to discover and discuss the various issues that impact the region.

© 2017 Egyptian Streets. All Rights Reserved.