News

CAPMAS: Egypt’s Youth 21% of Population

mm
CAPMAS: Egypt’s Youth 21% of Population

While Egypt’s youth and middle-class led Egypt’s historic protests, many worry that the lack of opportunities means many whose talents are vital to the country’s future are leaving the country.

A significant percentage of Egypt’s population, about 20.2 million, is aged between 18 to 29 according to Egypt’s Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS).

According to latest numbers, Egypt’s population consists of 97, 37 000 million approximately, so the number of youths represents around 21% of the population in accordance to this year’s statistics.

The majority of the youth are male, 50.6 percent while  49.4 percent are females. As for illiteracy, this affects 13.5% of the male population and 18.5 % of the female population of this age group.

The statement also read that a majority of youths were employed, around 49% while 25.7% remained jobless although 38.3% of this group holds university degrees.

Forbes describes a high unemployment rate as often a result of slow economy. While unemployment rates over 10% are associated with recessions, those over 20% could be indicators of economies in depression.

Nonetheless, a recent report by Harvard recorded that Egypt was the 3rd fasted developing economy in the coming decade.

By 2028, the working age population in Egypt will have increased by 20%  to a labor force of 80 million Egyptians who will all be needing jobs, read a statement by the IMF on May.

Men socialize at at El-Horreya Cafe/Bar, a popular “Baladi” bar in Cairo.

”Egypt needs to build on its recent economic success by deepening reforms. The bottom line is a focus on job creation,” says David Lipton, First Deputy Managing Director of the IMF who also explained that creating jobs will be Egypt’s biggest economic challenge.

”But at the same time, your biggest challenge, employing the youth, is also your biggest opportunity. If this country can tap the potential of its young people—by bringing unemployment and labor force participation to the level of many other emerging market countries—their absorption into the economy could boost growth into the range of 6 to 8 percent,” said Lipton in his statement, adding that the transformation ”would mean improving living standards for large segments of the population.

Prominent Egyptian Marxist Samir Amin Dies at 86
The Story of Sameera: World-Renowned Egyptian Nuclear Scientist

Subscribe to our newsletter


News

More in News

Egypt’s Public Prosecution Issues Call for Video Evidence of Fairmont Gang Rape Case

Egyptian StreetsFebruary 24, 2021

Egyptian Aged 40 or Older? You Can Register for COVID-19 Vaccination This Month

Egyptian StreetsFebruary 24, 2021

Egyptian Ministry Establishes ‘Equal Opportunity Unit’ to Promote Gender Equality and Counter Discrimination

Egyptian StreetsFebruary 22, 2021

Tamer Amin Show Suspended For Offensive Commentary on Upper Egyptians

Egyptian StreetsFebruary 20, 2021

Egypt’s Dar Al-Iftaa Launches ‘Birth Control is Permissible’ Hashtag to Counter Overpopulation

Egyptian StreetsFebruary 18, 2021

Biden Administration Announces $197 Million Arms Deal with Egypt

Egyptian StreetsFebruary 17, 2021

KSA Issues Shock Decision With Potential Business Impact on Egypt and the Region

Amina ZaineldineFebruary 17, 2021

Egypt’s COVID-19 Deaths Pass 10,000 Mark

Egyptian StreetsFebruary 16, 2021