News

Egypt Court Sentences Policeman to Life in Prison for Killing Tea Vendor

Egypt Court Sentences Policeman to Life in Prison for Killing Tea Vendor

FotorCreated

The Cairo Criminal Court sentenced a low-ranking policeman to life in prison on Wednesday for shooting dead a tea vendor and injuring two other civilians, state-owned Al-Ahram reported.

In April, policeman Zenhom Abdel Razek shot dead Mostafa Abdel Qader, a tea vendor, near the Rehab neighborhood on the outskirts of Cairo, after the two got into an argument over the price of a cup of tea.

According to the prosecutor’s investigations at the time, Abdel Razek had become accustomed to drinking tea from Abdel Qader’s small station without paying and the two got into an argument when the tea vendor demanded that the policeman pay for his tea. Abdel Razek then shot Abdel Qader in his chest, killing him, and injured two other civilians who tried to grab the policeman after he shot Abdel Qader.

The policeman was charged with murder and terrorizing citizens.

The incident garnered widespread media attention as incidents of police brutality continued to rise.

In February, a driver was killed in the district of Al-Darb Al-Ahmar by a police officer for a dispute over the fare. In August, a low-ranking policeman “accidentally” shot a microbus driver in the neck, leading to the driver’s death.

Police violence has also claimed lives within the police force; earlier this year, a policeman shot dead his colleague and justified his actions by saying that the slain colleague had bullied the policeman and “taunted” him with persistent comments on his Facebook posts that the policeman found “unhumorous.”

Prime Minister Sherif Ismail vowed to reform the country’s police force by enforcing new laws to curb its authority and regulate individual policemen’s daily interactions with citizens, after several incidents of police violence stirred public opinion.

However, authorities have maintained that the incidents of police violence are not representative of the entire institution and that the perpetrators constitute a “negligible” percentage of Egypt’s police force.

Police brutality was perhaps the most prominent grievance that sparked the January 25, 2011 revolution, with the case of Alexandrian citizen Khaled Said, who was beaten to death by plainclothes officers, bringing the issue of police brutality to the fore.

80,000 Join Ranks of Unemployed in Egypt During 3rd Quarter of 2016: CAPMAS
Egypt Slams Israeli Bill Legalizing Settlements in Occupied West Bank

Subscribe to our newsletter


News

More in News

30 Policemen Killed in a Shootout in Egypt’s Western Desert

Egyptian StreetsOctober 20, 2017

Greek Pianist Plays Cavafy Poems as Part of the 2017 Cavafia in Egypt

Maydaa Abo El NadarOctober 20, 2017

With New Power Plants, Egypt’s Solar Investments Surge in 2017

Egyptian StreetsOctober 19, 2017

Egypt Approves First Major Draft Traffic Law in 40 Years

Egyptian StreetsOctober 19, 2017

‘The Show Goes On’: Theatrical Performances Feature Stories of Women in Egypt

Engy AdhamOctober 18, 2017

Climate Change Triggered Social Unrest in Ancient Egypt: Study

Egyptian StreetsOctober 18, 2017

13 Egyptian Businesses Make Forbes’ Top List of Arab Startups

Egyptian StreetsOctober 17, 2017

About 276 Killed in Deadly Truck Bombings in Mogadishu, Somalia

Egyptian StreetsOctober 17, 2017
Egyptian Streets is an independent, young, and grass roots news media organization aimed at providing readers with an alternate depiction of events that occur on Egyptian and Middle Eastern streets, and to establish an engaging social platform for readers to discover and discuss the various issues that impact the region.

© 2017 Egyptian Streets. All Rights Reserved.